Trinidad and tobago dating

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British administrators, British planters, and their slaves added to the island's ethnic, national, and linguistic diversity.

Enslaved Africans arrived from varied ethnic, cultural, linguistic, and religious groups from along the West African coast, while Creole slaves spoke a French or English creole, depending on their islands of origin.

The island was called Iere, meaning "the land of the hummingbird," by its native Amerindian inhabitants.

Tobago's name probably derived from tabaco (tobacco in Spanish).

The national motto is "Together we aspire, together we achieve." The national anthem features the line "Here every creed and race find an equal place," which is sung twice for emphasis.

Standard and nonstandard English are spoken in Tobago. The public symbols of the nation tend to evoke the themes of multiculturalism, unity in diversity, and tolerance.

The East–West corridor is an urban–industrial conurbation from Port of Spain, the capital, in the west to Arima in the east. Afro-Trinidadians and other Creoles predominate in urban areas and in the north of Trinidad; Indo-Trinidadians live mostly in the central and south parts of the island. According to the 1990 census, the total population was 1,234,400.

San Fernando in the south is Trinidad's second city. The two major ethnic groups are Blacks (39.59 percent of the population) and East Indians (40.27 percent). At present, Trinidad is multilingual, with inhabitants speaking standard and nonstandard forms of English, a French-based creole, nonstandard Spanish, and Bhojpuri. Arabic, Yoruba, Bhojpuri, Urdu and other languages are used in religious contexts, and the traditional Christmas music called parang is sung in Spanish.

Trinidad (but not Tobago) is ethnically heterogeneous.

Trinidadians and Tobagonians of African descent are called "Negro," "Black," or "African." Trinidadians of Indian descent are called "East Indian" (to differentiate them from Amerindians) or "Indian." More recently the terms "Afro-Trinidadian" (or "Afro-Tobagonian") and "Indo-Trinidadian" have gained currency, reflecting heightened ethnic claims to national status.

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