Teen dating and vilonce

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report the following teen violence statistics (4): CDC did a study on electronic aggression; they define electronic aggression as, “…any kind of aggression perpetrated through technology—any type of harassment or bullying (teasing, telling lies, making fun of someone, making rude or mean comments, spreading rumors, or making threatening or aggressive comments) that occurs through e-mail, a chat room, instant messaging, a website (including blogs), text messaging, or videos or pictures posted on websites or sent through cell phones.” Their research shows the following teen violence statistics: The CDC has identified a few direct and indirect costs associated with teen violence.

Whether you are a student working on a school project about teen dating violence - or a parent looking for a way to talk with your teen about the difference between healthy and unhealthy behavior in a relationship - or a teacher working on a lesson plan for your health students, there are many free resources to help you #stop TDV including roleplaying activities, printable posters, and video games.

Whatever stage you and your teen are going through in discussing and learning about dating violence — whether you want to teach them about healthy relationships for the future, or you’re concerned with a relationship they are currently in and want to give them advice — there are plenty of resources that can be really helpful.

From phone numbers and victim services centers, to online pamphlets and sites, we’ve put together a list of some of the best resources for teens.

“I feel that there’s a gap that needs to be filled …

there need to be safe houses for teenagers who are scared and whose families have been threatened, so they don’t have to run away,” she said.

Teenagers will often be too scared or embarrassed to tell the truth so adults need to probe a little deeper if they are concerned by a child’s behavior or appearance.

A sudden change in personality or behavior Teenagers are notorious for sullen or moody behavior, but they might be acting out for a more serious reason.

A common misconception about teen dating violence is that survivors don’t experience the same level of abuse as adult women.

“A lot of the time people think that we’re young, and so it [the domestic violence] can’t be that bad,” she said.

Share them with your teen and look at them together, or simply pass them on.

By: JM Oran A tender smile crosses Kimberly Segovia’s face when she checks her smartphone and notices a text message from her fiancé.

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