History carbon dating

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Carbon-14 has a half-life of 5,730 ± 40 years—, half the amount of the radioisotope present at any given time will undergo spontaneous disintegration during the succeeding 5,730 years. It has proved to be a versatile technique of dating fossils and archaeological specimens from 500 to 50,000 years old.Because carbon-14 decays at this constant rate, an estimate of the date at which an organism died can be made by measuring the amount of its residual radiocarbon. The method is widely used by Pleistocene geologists, anthropologists, archaeologists, and investigators in related fields.

The same amount of carbon-14 is present in animals, which get their carbon by eating plants or other animals.

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Factor 4: Industrialization (past burning of coal).

It is widely accepted that the mass burning of coal during the industrial revolution released an enormous amount of C ratio before the industrial revolution, and modern carbon dating takes this into account by running experimental measurements through a calibration formula.[vii] But how do we know what the ratio was like thousands of years ago? The dating system hangs on these types of assumptions! Several studies have shown: 1) significant solar flares have occurred in the past, and 2) these flares have an impact on carbon levels in the atmosphere.

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